October 17, 2017
Arts & Entertainment
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  • Known for the ‘90s cartoon series “Life with Louie” and a stint as host of the popular game show “Family Feud,” Louie Anderson will visit Rams Head On Stage June 18 to joke about the F words: family, food, fathers and fat over 50.
    Known for the ‘90s cartoon series “Life with Louie” and a stint as host of the popular game show “Family Feud,” Louie Anderson will visit Rams Head On Stage June 18 to joke about the F words: family, food, fathers and fat over 50.
  • Henry Cho will bring his clean style of humor to Rams Head on July 30. “Basically, I try to make my shows feel as though the audience has invited me over for dinner and something funny happened on the way,” Cho said.
    Henry Cho will bring his clean style of humor to Rams Head on July 30. “Basically, I try to make my shows feel as though the audience has invited me over for dinner and something funny happened on the way,” Cho said.

Laughs And Drafts Brings Renowned Comedians To Rams Head

Zach Sparks
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View Bio
June 27, 2017

Whether you like your humor clean or crude, you’ll have the opportunity to witness some intriguing comedy in the coming weeks and months as Rams Head On Stage in Annapolis hosts its Laughs and Drafts series. Among the headliners are Louie Anderson, Henry Cho, Dave Attell and Jim Breuer.

While enjoying each show, attendees can enjoy craft beer pitchers and domestic bottle buckets, and every ticket-buyer will receive a free Fordham & Dominion Brewery Tour.

But the focus, of course, is the entertainment. Anderson and Cho shared their thoughts on their comedic approach and what crowds can expect.

Louie Anderson
Date: June 18 at 5:30pm and 8:30pm
Tickets: $35

Since making his national television debut on “The Tonight Show” in 1984, Louie Anderson has racked up accolades. He is known for the ‘90s cartoon series “Life with Louie,” a stint as host of the popular game show “Family Feud” and a small but memorable part in the Eddie Murphy film “Coming to America.” Since then, he has continued to make people laugh as one of Comedy Central’s 100 Greatest Stand-Ups of All Time.

Growing up as one of 11 children, Anderson has used family as the inspiration for many jokes, but he’s not limited to that subject. “I try to do something for everything in my show,” Anderson said. “I throw the new stuff in here to give people a treat. Expect funny and all the F words: family, food, fathers and fat over 50!”

Although he doesn’t interact frequently with the audience, Anderson has had memorable encounters. “One time, I was talking to an audience member and he wasn't responding, and I said, ‘What are you deaf?’ The person with him answered, ‘Yes!’”

Anderson has endeared a new legion of fans with his portrayal of matriarch Christine Baskets in FX’s slapstick comedy “Baskets,” landing him the Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series in 2016. His other success notwithstanding, he still lists standup comedy as his favorite medium.

“Standup is my first love,” Anderson said. “The Emmy is fantastic, but on my gravestone, I want it to read, ‘He made people laugh and he was nice. Also, he was a three- or four-time Emmy winner.’”

Henry Cho
Date: July 30 at 8:00pm
Tickets: $30

“Yeah, I know what may be goin’ through your mind right now. Just let it soak in a second or two. Cuz there’s something wrong with this picture, ain’t there? Kinda goin,’ ‘Hang on, that Asian guy is up there talking like a hillbilly.’”

Thus began Henry Cho’s first appearance on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” in 1992 as he discussed the challenges of being a full-blooded Korean born and raised in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Since then, the clean comedian has continued to joke about life in the south and fatherhood, from the “The Tonight Show” to CBS’s “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson” to his Comedy Central Special “What’s That Clickin’ Noise?” Throughout the year, Cho performs everywhere from Las Vegas to cruise ships.

“Funny is funny, and some off-color jokes are brilliant. I loved Richard Pryor, and Chris Rock is an old pal who still makes me laugh,” Cho said. “My approach has always been to be clean because it is who I am or at least try to be. Jerry Seinfeld told me 30 years ago he didn't understand honing a joke you could never say on TV – this was back when network TV was our only source.”

Cho said that the first 45 seconds of his show are planned, but after that, he connects with the audience and modifies his set according to that demographic.

“I adjust my show to who's out there,” he said. “I have a lot of universal jokes, but then I conform the rest of my show to the crowd or at least try.”

That may mean parenthood jokes for an audience of families, or anecdotes about his Alabaman wife if he’s performing in the south.

“Basically, I try to make my shows feel as though the audience has invited me over for dinner and something funny happened on the way,” Cho said, “so I tell that story, which triggers someone to tell a similar story, which opens the floodgates for me to tell a multitude of stories. Then, for dessert, they pay me for being funny.”

For tickets or more information on Laughs and Drafts, visit www.ramsheadonstage.com or call 410-268-4545.

 


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