November 18, 2017
Community
59° Overcast
  • More than 50 colorful, creative floats and walking units made up this year’s Caring & Sharing Community Harvest Parade. Participating groups included businesses, nonprofits, churches, schools, clubs and other local groups.
    More than 50 colorful, creative floats and walking units made up this year’s Caring & Sharing Community Harvest Parade. Participating groups included businesses, nonprofits, churches, schools, clubs and other local groups.
  • More than 50 colorful, creative floats and walking units made up this year’s Caring & Sharing Community Harvest Parade. Participating groups included businesses, nonprofits, churches, schools, clubs and other local groups.
    More than 50 colorful, creative floats and walking units made up this year’s Caring & Sharing Community Harvest Parade. Participating groups included businesses, nonprofits, churches, schools, clubs and other local groups.
  • Despite gray skies, loyal spectators sat outside to take part in the tradition of watching the parade and donating nonperishable food to its charitable cause.
    Despite gray skies, loyal spectators sat outside to take part in the tradition of watching the parade and donating nonperishable food to its charitable cause.
  • Despite gray skies, loyal spectators sat outside to take part in the tradition of watching the parade and donating nonperishable food to its charitable cause.
    Despite gray skies, loyal spectators sat outside to take part in the tradition of watching the parade and donating nonperishable food to its charitable cause.
  • More than 50 colorful, creative floats and walking units made up this year’s Caring & Sharing Community Harvest Parade. Participating groups included businesses, nonprofits, churches, schools, clubs and other local groups.
    More than 50 colorful, creative floats and walking units made up this year’s Caring & Sharing Community Harvest Parade. Participating groups included businesses, nonprofits, churches, schools, clubs and other local groups.
  • More than 50 colorful, creative floats and walking units made up this year’s Caring & Sharing Community Harvest Parade. Participating groups included businesses, nonprofits, churches, schools, clubs and other local groups.
    More than 50 colorful, creative floats and walking units made up this year’s Caring & Sharing Community Harvest Parade. Participating groups included businesses, nonprofits, churches, schools, clubs and other local groups.

PBA Parade Shines Bright Despite Gray Skies

Dylan Roche
picture
View Bio
November 10, 2017

For one colorful and fun-filled afternoon on Sunday, November 5, Pasadena received a visit from an eclectic and outlandish roster of people — troll dolls, 18th-century farmers, fairytale characters, superheroes, jungle animals, and even Santa and Mrs. Claus, all of whom had come together to inspire the community’s sense of charity and gratitude in the spirit of the Thanksgiving holiday.

The Caring & Sharing Community Harvest Parade, organized and sponsored by the Pasadena Business Association, defied the gloomy weather and brought together 52 floats and walking units from local civic groups, businesses, schools, nonprofits and other local organizations. The procession wound its way through the streets of Pasadena, where groups of loyal spectators had gathered to watch and to donate nonperishable food goods.

In addition to collecting food for families in need, the parade honored lifelong Pasadena resident Henry Schmidt as its grand marshal. Still a hands-on member of the community at 87 years old, Schmidt said he keeps up with his civic work because he enjoys it. “I could sit at home in a rocking chair at 87, but I’d rather be out and be active,” he said. Regarding the honor of being grand marshal, he added, “It gives you a good feeling to know that someone else recognizes you’ve done something good for the community.”

Doing good for the community was a theme of the day at the parade. As in years past, business owners and volunteers worked hard making sure the parade’s charitable mission was a success. In the weeks prior to parade day, Lauer’s Supermarket & Bakery gave customers the option of buying preassembled grocery bags at cost for donation, and owners Bernie Snoops and Babbie Poyer estimated their customers had donated $6,000 worth of food this year.

They also had assistance from the Northeast High School football players to collect canned goods and other nonperishable food from spectators along the route. “It makes you feel good because instead of sitting at home doing nothing, I came out and did something,” said Demontay Snowden, who has volunteered for the parade for four years.

Coach Jesse Reiger explained that volunteering isn’t required by the team — it’s a choice the players make. “They don’t have to be here,” he said. “They like interacting with people and giving back to the community.”

Among the many community members who wouldn’t let gray skies deter them from watching the parade were four generations of the Carson family, who have a tradition of gathering for the parade every year and following it up with a chili dinner together. The kids said their favorite part of the parade is always collecting the candy that’s handed out, while the adults agreed that their favorite part is the chance to donate to a good cause.

Also in the crowd was Lisa Hester, who brought her 15-month-old daughter Faith to watch the parade. “My parents have been bringing me since I was little, and now that [Faith] is big enough, I want to bring her too,” Hester said.

Sue McDonald, a member of the outreach committee with St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, has come to see the parade for the past five years, and this year, she brought fellow committee members Fred and Bertha Ryals to see the parade for the first time. St. Andrew’s succeeded in collecting 13 large brown paper grocery bags and 10 cardboard boxes of nonperishable foods to donate.

With 52 groups participating, the judges had their work cut out for them to name the winning floats and walking units. Historic Hancock’s Resolution was named Best Community Entry for the authentic 18th-century garb the group’s members were wearing. Northeast High School’s junior ROTC (Reserve Officers Training Corps) earned the judges’ respect and the title of Most Patriotic. Chesapeake Christian Learning Center delighted the crowd with its troll costumes and won the award for Best Youth Group. Chesapeake Christian Center wowed everyone with an impressive dance number and received the title of Best Musical Performance. Century 21 Don Gurney’s office recreated all the characters from “The Wizard of Oz” authentically enough to receive the award for Best Business. Finally, Angey’s Tangles impressed with a fairytale display — complete with Rapunzel locked away in a tower — and won the combined titles of Best Overall and Most Original.

Those who missed the parade — or those who just want to relive it — will be able to see video from the afternoon when it airs on Anne Arundel TV over Thanksgiving weekend, or on YouTube. Visit www.pasadenabusinessassociation.com for updates on broadcast times and channels.


Sidebar Ad

Faces of the Voice

  • Lonnie Lancione
    Publisher
  • Dylan Roche
    Editor
    @dylroche
    @dylroche
    @dylroche
  • William Nauman
    Creative Director
  • Zach Sparks
    Assistant Editor
    @Sparks907
    @Sparks907
    @Sparks907
  • Colin Murphy
    Sports Editor
    @ArVoiceSports / @ColinAJMurphy
    @SPVoiceSports / @ColinAJMurphy
    @PVoiceSports / @ColinAJMurphy
  • Larry Sells
    Vice President, Sales and Development
    @LarrySells1
    @LarrySells1
    @LarrySells1
  • Brian Lancione
    V.P., Operations
  • Dianna Lancione
    Publisher
    parkiewoman

Latest Tweets

  • PasadenaVoice

    RT @PVoiceSports: Dylan Young's 23-yd TD pass to Russell Tongue caps a 7-play, 90-yd Chesapeake drive (which featured a 35-yd completion fr…
  • PasadenaVoice

    RT @SunsetAACPS: Commemorating Veterans' Day with our special guest speakers in Mrs. Crawford's class. Thank you Mr. & Mrs. Nungester for y…
  • PasadenaVoice

    Not all heroes wear capes. These Pasadena veterans discuss their time in the military: pasadenavoice.com/community/memo…

Events Calendar

Request an Advertising Quote

Please do not add dashes. (ex: 4106479400)
Do not enter anything here.
Search Articles
Search Authors
Search Blog